Archive For The “Landscape” Category

Metallica, Cart Gap Beach, Happisburgh

Metallica, Cart Gap Beach, Happisburgh

Metallica

Metallica, a vibrant and colourful landscape photograph of some rocks at Cart Gap Beach (Happisburgh), Norfolk, UK. Happisburgh beach has been victim to bad erosion over the years and 25 houses have been lost to sea. The beach has a good size car park (park and pay) and an excellent park for children to play. Happisburgh is also home to the oldest working light house in Britain. Whilst you are there I recommend you visit Smallsticks cafe for a nice cuppa.

Happisburgh

Happisburgh is a village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is on the coast, to the east of a north-south road, the B1159 from Bacton on the coast to Stalham. It is a nucleated village. The nearest substantial town is North Walsham 6 miles (10 km) to the west.

Happisburgh became a site of national archaeological importance in 2010 when flint tools over 800,000 years old were unearthed. This is the oldest evidence of human occupation anywhere in the UK. In May 2013, a series of early human footprints were discovered on the beach at the site, providing direct evidence of early human activity at the site.

The civil parish shrank by over 0.2 km² in the 20th century by the erosion of its beaches and low cliffs. Groynes were constructed along the shore to try to stop the erosion. In the 2001 census, before the separation of Walcott parish to the north-west, the parish (which also includes the settlements of Happisburgh Common and Whimpwell Green) had a population of 1,372 in 607 households. For the purposes of local government, the parish is in the district of North Norfolk – Wikipedia

Summer Pine Cone, Horsford Woods

Summer Pine Cone, Horsford Woods

Summer Pine Cone

Summer acorn, this little Pine Cone was by its lonesome at Horsford Woods, Norfolk, UK. This shot was captured during July 2016 on a beautiful summers day.

A cone (in formal botanical usage: strobilus, plural strobili) is an organ on plants in the division Pinophyta (conifers) that contains the reproductive structures. The familiar woody cone is the female cone, which produces seeds. The male cones, which produce pollen, are usually herbaceous and much less conspicuous even at full maturity. The name “cone” derives from the fact that the shape in some species resembles a geometric cone. The individual plates of a cone are known as scales.

The male cone (microstrobilus or pollen cone) is structurally similar across all conifers, differing only in small ways (mostly in scale arrangement) from species to species. Extending out from a central axis are microsporophylls (modified leaves). Under each microsporophyll is one or several microsporangia (pollen sacs).

The female cone (megastrobilus, seed cone, or ovulate cone) contains ovules which, when fertilized by pollen, become seeds. The female cone structure varies more markedly between the different conifer families, and is often crucial for the identification of many specianous of conifers.

Horsford

A village six miles north of Norwich, England which is surrounded by the Horsford Forest and is named after the dried up section of the River Hor. It’s population has seen a steady increase since the Second World War, growing from 750 in 1945 to just under 4000 today (2001 census).

There are various explanations of the village name. It is usually said to derive from ‘horse ford’, but it has also been suggested that it comes from the River Hor on which the village stands (more usually known to locals as ‘the Beck’). A third explanation is that it comes from Horsa, the name of a Saxon chief.

The surrounding Horsford Forest has been designated a County Wildlife Site. The rare Silver-Studded Blue butterfly has a colony in this Forest. – Wikipedia

Photography Tips:

This particular image was captured laying on the ground in Horsford Woods. You never know what to expect shooting landscapes, so dress for all weather. Waterproof trousers are highly recommended, that way you can get as dirty as you like. Landscape photographs don’t always have to be big and airy, they can also be in a mini\macro form.

 

Find Yourself

Find Yourself

Find yourself – A calm solace moment of self reflection, there is nothing quite like finding yourself and discovering who you are. This image can say a thousand words depending on who is observing it.This photo was captured at Hunstanton Beach, UK as it is East Anglia’s only west facing beach. I had a 90 mile trip and a 3 hour wait to capture this. The sunset was captured late in the evening using a ND filter. I like the silhouette effect of the lady gazing at the sunset and the way the light reflects off the water.

Recommended Print: Epson Semi-Gloss

A Hunstanton Sunset

A Hunstanton Sunset

 

A 90 mile trip and a 3 hour wait and this is what you get. I enjoyed shooting this sunset on a very calm and tranquil evening, the sunset was at 20:48pm and I arrived at 17:00pm to locate the perfect spot and setup the camera. Hunstanton Beach is Norfolk’s only west facing beach which is required to get amazing sunset’s.

Hunstanton is a 19th-century resort town, initially known as New Hunstanton so distinguished from the adjacent old village from which it took its name. The new town long ago eclipsed the village in scale and population.

The original settlement of Hunstanton is now known as Old Hunstanton, probably taking its name from the River Hun which runs to the coast just to the east of Old Hunstanton. It is also said that the name Hunstanton originated from the word “Honeystone”, a reference to the local red Carr stone. The river begins in the grounds of Old Hunstanton Park which surrounds the old moated hall, the ancestral home of the Le Strange family. Old Hunstanton village is of prehistoric origin and is situated near to the head of Peddars Way. In 1970, evidence of Neolithic settlement was found. The quiet character of Old Hunstanton remains distinct from and complements that of its busy sibling, with clifftop walks past a privately owned redundant lighthouse and the ruins of St. Edmund’s Chapel, built in 1272. – Wikipedia

Recommended Print: Epson Semi-Gloss

Britannia

Britannia

A beautiful English sunny day in Norwich, Norfolk, UK. In the far distance is Norwich Prison, which houses a cafe (Britannia Cafe) that is run by the inmates and is very good! The photograph was initially unplanned I was actually out and about to capture a different location, however, I was passing and couldn’t resist the urge. The photo was captured at around 08:00 am, there was hardly anyone around, other than the odd dog walker and was absolutely bliss.

The prison cafe – Based at the former Britannia Barracks with spectacular views over Norwich and is a shabby chic cafe offering freshly cooked British cuisine. Open 7 days a week, the cafe is staffed by category D low risk prisoners, that have  volunteered to learn new skills, improve their lives and make a fresh start. All tips and profits generated from the cafe go to rehabilitating prisoners and charitable causes.

Since the launch in January 2014, Cafe Britannia has donated over £5,000 to Victim Support.

Britannia Cafe – http://www.cafebritannia.co.uk/

Recommended Print: Epson Semi-Gloss

Generation

Generation

Generation, a monochromatic photograph of a granddad and his nephew overlooking the ocean at a Norfolk beach, England. The weather and landscape was perfect for this capture and the pose was actually natural.

 

 

Before and After

Before and After

Before and After, a blended photograph of a local park in Norfolk, UK. Ironically the park does have a mini steam train, maybe that is what inspired me to create this photograph.

ATON PARK MINIATURE RAILWAY

Eaton Park’s miniature railway comprises the original elevated track and a longer ground level track which runs through a beautiful meadow. It is run and cared for by the Norwich and District Society of Model Engineers Ltd (NDSME)  and is one of the park’s most popular attractions.

NDSME was founded in 1933 particularly for the”…impecunious junior, who can find somewhere to work with plenty of tools available and a senior in attendance to give advice and discourage bad work.” Its roots are in Norwich’s great engineering company Laurence Scott and Electromotors.

Click here for more information on Eaton Park miniature railway

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