Archive For The “City” Category

London, River Thames its all marmite, you either love her or hate her

London, River Thames its all marmite, you either love her or hate her

London

 

 

You either love her or hate her, regardless of your feelings for her, London does offer a great day out especially for photographers. London offers some fantastic city skylines, architecture, history and character. This photograph was taken around the Charing Cross area, near the London Eye and markets. The markets are full of street life and I urge you to visit them when in London. As a photographer, there are so many locations to shoot and finding the ideal spot takes time.

The River Thames

The River Thames is a river that flows through southern England. At 215 miles, it is the longest river entirely in England and the second longest in the United Kingdom, after the River Severn. It also flows through Oxford, Reading, Henley-on-Thames and Windsor. The lower reaches of the river are called the Tideway, derived from its long tidal reach up to Teddington Lock. It rises at Thames Head in Gloucestershire, and flows into the North Sea via the Thames Estuary. The Thames drains the whole of Greater London.

Its tidal section, reaching up to Teddington Lock, includes most of its London stretch and has a rise and fall of 7 metres. Running through some of the driest parts of mainland Britain and heavily abstracted for drinking water, the Thames’ discharge is low considering its length and breadth: the Severn has a discharge almost twice as large on average despite having a smaller drainage basin. In Scotland, the Tay achieves more than double the average discharge from a drainage basin that is 60% smaller,

The administrative powers of the Thames Conservancy have been taken on with modifications by the Environment Agency and, in respect of the Tideway part of the river, such powers are split between the agency and the Port of London Authority, Wikipedia.

Photography Tips:

Visiting large capital cities such as London, requires time, planning and patience. I advise not to take too much equipment and take a good ‘all-round’ lens. Cities are busy and the weather is not always pleasant (in UK anyway), so be prepared. personally, I do not have the luxury of multiple cameras, if I did I would take a camera like the Sony A7 series. These cameras are top spec and small ideal for travelling. Take a few batteries with you if possible, a good bag, lens wipes and weatherproof clothing. I used a Sony SAL1680Z lens, this is a good ‘all-round’ lens to shoot with, though there are many choices.

City

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The Riverfront Festive Truck

The Riverfront Festive Truck

The Riverfront festivities of London

The Riverfront Festive Truck,  a bold bright red truck offering wonderful Christmas treats such as mulled wine for a small price. Christmas shopping in London is a magical experience, busy but exciting. There is everything to suit all budgets, all that is needed is time and effort. I highly recommend a nice warm mulled wine whilst touring the shops.

Downton New London Association Board

The Downtown New London Association is a non-profit organization of approximately 60 merchants in the Downtown New London area. The DNLA has been the organizing agency of Sailfest for the past twenty years. Sailfest is presently in its 36th year. All money raised during Sailfest is directly donated back into the city by supporting other local organizations.

Click here for Downton New London Association Board

Photography Tips:

First of all you need to place yourself in London,  should you find yourself living outside of London I recommend getting the train in. If you are there only for the photography, then I advise taking a camera, travel tripod, zoom lens and spare batteries. London is extremely busy all year around but especially at Christmas, comfortable footwear is a must. During the day, you should be able to shoot at ISO 100\200\400 depending on the sunlight available.

The Bell Tower

The Bell Tower

The Bell Tower, City Hall, Norwich, Norfolk, United Kingdom. This photograph was captured on a peaceful spring evening, I really liked the way the spotlight was shining on teh clock face.

The architects designed for Norwich an Art Deco public building of national significance. It was built to the highest standards, using superior materials and methods of its day. Even the bricks were specially made, each one being two inches longer than usual to better reflect the proportions of the finished building. Charles Holloway James and Stephen Rowland Pierce engaged Alfred Hardiman as their consultant sculptor. He contributed the iconic lions passant which guard the building, and three figures of Recreation, Wisdom and Education for the Council Chamber. His colleague James Woodford designed the six main bronze doors, incorporating 18 roundels showing the history and industry of Norwich. Eric Aumonier carved the city arms above the Regalia Room window on Bethel Street, and Margaret Calkin James provided textiles for some of the important rooms.

Over the years many Art Deco buildings have lost their hallmark fixtures and fittings, but Norwich retains many of its original features. This is particularly fortunate as the furniture, light fittings and other details throughout the building were designed by the architects themselves.

The materials used include Italian marble and English stone, Honduras mahogany and Australian walnut. Seating is upholstered in Moroccan leather, and rooms panelled in elm, oak, teak and birch. The Lord Mayor’s octagonal parlour is panelled in sycamore with French walnut trim, with the door finished in English walnut. The main frontage of the building is 280 feet long, incorporating a 200ft balcony

https://www.norwich.gov.uk/site/

City Lights

City Lights

City Lights, outside City Hall, Norwich, Norfolk, United Kingdom. A monochromatic photograph captured on a beautiful spring evening. This photograph was featured in the Evening News, Norwich local newspaper.

Norwich City Hall was opened in 1938 by King George VI and Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother. It had been designed by architects Charles Holloway James and Stephen Rowland Pierce, after Robert Atkinson had prepared a layout for the whole Civic Centre site at the request of Norwich Corporation (now the City Council). A competition took place in 1931 which attracted 143 entries, with Atkinson as the sole judge. After the winning design was chosen the Depression and a protracted planning process delayed the start of the building, and the foundation stone was not laid until 1936. Norwich City Hall was officially opened by the King and Queen on 29 October 1938 and a huge crowd turned out to celebrate. Less than a year later the Second World War broke out and Norwich was extensively bombed, but the building survived intact. The austerity that followed the war ensured no project of similar quality could be contemplated. Today, Norwich City Hall stands as an exemplary building of its period, completed to the highest standards of architectural integrity and individual craftsmanship. – Wikipedia

https://www.norwich.gov.uk/site/

http://www.eveningnews24.co.uk/home

Just slow down

Just slow down

Just slow down, a monochromatic photograph of the hustle and bustle of a busy shopping centre, Chapelfield Mall, Norwich, Norfolk, UK. The was captured during the Christmas period and one thing that came to mind, was the chaos people go through to buy presents.

The Christmas season, or festive season, (also called the holiday season or simply the holidays, mainly in the U.S. and Canada), is an annually recurring period recognized in many Western and Western-influenced countries that is generally considered to run from late November to early January,  defined as incorporating at least Christmas, and usually New Year, and sometimes various other holidays and festivals. It incorporates a period of shopping which comprises a peak season for the retail sector (the “Christmas (or holiday) shopping season”), and a period of sales at the end of the season (the “January sales”). Christmas window displays and Christmas tree lighting ceremonies when trees decorated with ornaments and light bulbs are illuminated, are traditions in many areas.

Originally within the Roman Catholic Church, the term “Christmas season” was considered synonymous with Christmastide,  a term associated with Yuletide, which runs from December 25 (Christmas Day) to January 6 (Epiphany), popularly known as the 12 Days of Christmas. However, as the economic impact involving the anticipatory lead-up to Christmas Day grew in America and Europe into the 19th and 20th centuries, the term “Christmas season” began to become synonymous instead with the traditional Christian Advent season, the period observed in Western Christianity from the fourth Sunday before Christmas Day until Christmas Day itself. The term “Advent calendar” survives in secular Western parlance as a term referring to a countdown to Christmas Day from the beginning of December.

Beginning in the mid-20th century, as the Christian-associated Christmas holiday became increasingly secularized and central to American economics and culture while religio-multicultural sensitivity rose, generic references to the season that omitted the word “Christmas” became more common in the corporate and public sphere of the United States, which has caused a semantics controversy that continues to the present. By the late 20th century, the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah and the African American cultural holiday of Kwanzaa began to be considered in the U.S. as being part of the “holiday season”, a term that as of 2013 has become equally or more prevalent than “Christmas season” in U.S. sources to refer to the end-of-the-year festive period. “Holiday season” has also spread in varying degrees to Canada; however, in the United Kingdom and Ireland, the phrase “holiday season” is not widely understood to be synonymous with the Christmas–New Year period, and is often instead associated with summer holidays. – Wikipedia

Click here for Chapelfield Mall, Norwich, Norfolk, UK

Church Explosion, No treason here

Church Explosion, No treason here

Church Explosion

Church explosion, this photograph was captured on fireworks night (5th November) 2015 in Norwich, UK. The image itself consists of 3 photographs (all mine) blended into one. The church in the background is St Peter Mancroft located in the heart of the city next to the forum.

Guy Fawkes Night

Also known as Guy Fawkes Day, Bonfire Night and Firework Night, is an annual commemoration observed on 5 November, primarily in Great Britain. Its history begins with the events of 5 November 1605, when Guy Fawkes, a member of the Gunpowder Plot, was arrested while guarding explosives the plotters had placed beneath the House of Lords. Celebrating the fact that King James I had survived the attempt on his life, people lit bonfires around London, and months later the introduction of the Observance of 5th November Act enforced an annual public day of thanksgiving for the plot’s failure.

Photography Tips:

 

 

Silver Trees

Silver Trees

Silver Trees, a monochromatic photograph of a busy market in central London (Charing Cross). The bright whites gives the look and feel these trees are made of silver,  which is apt for a busy market making lots of money.

Charing Cross denotes the junction of Strand, Whitehall and Cockspur Street, just south of Trafalgar Square in central London. It gives its name to several landmarks, including Charing Cross railway station, one of the main London rail terminals.

Charing Cross is named after the Eleanor cross that stood on the site, in what was once the hamlet of Charing. The site of the cross has been occupied since 1675 by an equestrian statue of King Charles I. A loose Victorian replica of the medieval cross, the Queen Eleanor Memorial Cross, was erected a short distance to the east outside the railway station.

Until 1931, “Charing Cross” referred to the part of Whitehall between Great Scotland Yard and Trafalgar Square. At least one property retains a “Charing Cross” postal address: Drummonds Bank, on the corner of Whitehall and The Mall, which is designated “49 Charing Cross” (not to be confused with Charing Cross Road).

Since the early 19th century, Charing Cross has often been regarded as the notional “centre of London”, and is now the point used to measure distances from London – Wikipedia

Click here for information on Charing Cross

Gypsy Wheel, Rekorderlig Lodge, London, UK

Gypsy Wheel, Rekorderlig Lodge, London, UK

Gypsy Wheel

The wheel in the background is the London Eye, when capturing this photograph the lights of the Rekorderlig Lodge made me feel I was standing at a fair ground, hence the name Gypsy Wheel. The Southbank Centre, London, UK is full of culture and things to do, Southbank is all about the ‘art’ and art should be available to every one. If you are a fan of drama, plays, acting, musicals and entertainment in general you will love the South Bank Centre.

Rekorderlig Lodge

A slice of Scandi style, the Rekorderlig Cider Lodge is a wonderful two-floor structure that resembles a quintessential Scandinavian house. Enjoy winter drinks and delicious Scandinavian street food in a cosy pop-up bar.

The Tube

The Tube

The Tube,  Embankment tube in London, the tube is an interesting place full of characters and culture. It always amazes me who busy and hot it is in the underground and must be difficult having to use this method of transport every day.

Embankment is a London Underground station in the City of Westminster, known by various names during its history. It is served by the Circle,District, Northern and Bakerloo lines. On the Northern and Bakerloo lines, the station is between Waterloo and Charing Cross stations; on the Circle and District lines, it is between Westminster and Temple and is in Travelcard Zone 1. The station has two entrances, one on Victoria Embankment and the other on Villiers Street. The station is adjacent to Victoria Embankment Gardens and is close to Charing Cross station,Embankment Pier, Hungerford Bridge, Cleopatra’s Needle, the Royal Air Force Memorial, the Savoy Chapel and Savoy Hotel and the Playhouse and New Players Theatres.

The station is in two parts: sub-surface platforms opened in 1870 by the District Railway (DR) as part of the company’s extension of the Inner Circle eastwards from Westminster to Blackfriars and deep-level platforms opened in 1906 by the Baker Street and Waterloo Railway (BS&WR) and 1914 by the Charing Cross, Euston and Hampstead Railway (CCE&HR). A variety of underground and main line services have operated over the sub-surface tracks and the CCE&HR part of the station was reconstructed in the 1920s – Wikipedia

Embankment Underground Station

Shopping

 

Shopping

People shopping in London

Shopping, a photograph of people shopping in London during the Christmas period. If you haven’t been to London, I recommend the visit.

London is the capital and most populous city of England, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom. On the River Thames in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.  London’s ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries. Since at least the 19th century, “London” has also referred to the metropolis around this core, which now forms the county of Greater London governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly, historically split between Middlesex, Essex,Surrey, Kent, and Hertfordshire. – wikipedia

Click here for information on shopping in London

Visit London

Ride and pay for life

Ride and pay for life

Ride and pay for life, a compositional photo of some ‘hire bikes’ in London, UK. There was so much red in this photo I decided to emphasize it with a colour pop.

Santander Cycles is London’s self-service, bike-sharing scheme for short journeys

You can hire a bike from as little as £2. Simply go to any docking station with your bank card and touch the screen to get started.

There’s no need to book – hire a bike, ride it where you like, then return it to any docking station.

Click here for London bike hire

 

Two come along at once

Two come along at once

Two come along at once, this photo was taken in London, UK. I used a slow shutter speed for this photo of about 1/6 to capture the movement of the buses. London is a fantastic place for photographers so much going on, impossible to run out of ideas.

Omnibus is the Latin for “for all”, and refers to a passenger-carrying vehicle, originally an enclosed horse-drawn one

Horse-drawn buses were used from the 1820s, followed by steam buses in the 1830s, and electric trolleybuses in 1882.The first internal combustion engine buses, or motor buses, were used in 1895. Recently, interest has been growing in hybrid electric buses, fuel cell buses, and electric buses, as well as ones powered by compressed natural gas or biodiesel. As of the 2010s, bus manufacturing is increasingly globalised, with the same designs appearing around the world – wikipedia

Click here for London transport routes

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