Archive For The “Architecture” Category

Walsingham Abbey, Norfolk

Walsingham Abbey, Norfolk

Due to Walsingham Abbey’s strict photography rules, this photograph is NOT available to purchase, unless agreed by the Abbey itself. 

Walsingham Abbey

Walsingham Abbey was like walking back in time, the grounds are kept very well and presentable, the surrounding buildings\ruins are very impressive. The grounds offer some lovely short walks through the woods and by the river. The abbey is well known for its religious pilgrimage dating back since the 11th century and its snowdrops which bloom in February.

The Priory was a monastic house in Walsingham, Norfolk, England. The priory is perhaps best known for housing a Marian shrine with a supposed replica of the house of the Holy Family in Nazareth.

From the first this shrine of Our Lady was a famous place of pilgrimage. Hither came the faithful from all parts of England and from the continent until the destruction of the priory by Henry VIII in 1538. To this day the main road of the pilgrims through Newmarket, Brandon, and Fakenham is still called the Palmers’ Way. Many were the gifts of lands, rents, and churches to the canons of Walsingham, and many the miracles wrought at Our Lady’s shrine.

Henry III came on a pilgrimage in 1241, Edward I in 1280 and 1296. Edward II in 1315, Henry VI in 1455. Henry VII in 1487, and Henry VIII in 151. Erasmus in fulfillment of a vow made a pilgrimage from Cambridge in 1511, and left as his offering a set of Greek verses expressive of his piety. Thirteen years later he wrote his colloquy on pilgrimages, wherein the wealth and magnificence of Walsingham are set forth, and some of the reputed miracles rationalized

In 1537, while the last prior, Richard Vowell, was paying obsequious respect to Cromwell, the sub-prior Nicholas Milcham was charged with conspiring to rebel against the suppression of the lesser monasteries, and on flimsy evidence was convicted of high treason and hanged outside the priory walls- Wikipedia

Walsingham Abbey

The Walsingham Arch

Photography Tips:

Walsingham Abbey has lots to offer from, buildings to beautiful gardens. I recommend taking a lens that has a good zoom, get prepared for architectural and landscape photography. If you have plenty of time I would arrive early as there is no time limit on how long you can stay. A small travel tripod would be ideal for this location. Just be aware of the abbey’s strict photography rules to what you can and cannot do.

Architecture

 

Something is wrong. Response takes too long or there is JS error. Press Ctrl+Shift+J or Cmd+Shift+J on a Mac.
Darkitecture, for the lovers of dark arts

Darkitecture, for the lovers of dark arts

Darkitecture

Darkitecture, the  entrance to Colchester Zoo. This photograph is all about composition and tones.  Anyone who knows me, will know I enjoy dark photography, not just the colours but also the concept. Darkitecture is all about drama, contrast and angles, the deep rich tones create a unique twist to this building. The slants of the rooftop is what attracted me to capture this photograph and I enjoy capturing unique architecture.

Monochrome photography

Monochrome photography is where the image produced has a single hue, rather than recording the colors of the object. This includes all forms of black-and-white photography, images containing tones of grey ranging from black to white. Other hues besides grey, such as sepia, cyan or brown can also be used in monochrome photography. Monochrome is mostly used for artistic reasons in the contemporary world.

Monochrome photography is a popular genre and even comes with its own international awards, mono awards. You can discover some fantastic monochrome photographers, such as Pia Elizondo, Michel Rajkovic, Ben Nixon and many  more. Many photographers tend to specialise in a specific genre whether it be landscapes, models, fine art, and macro to name a few. I personally enjoy historical and documentary photography.

Photography Tips:

I recommend to shoot in RAW, these files are uncompressed and unprocessed image files, that come straight from the image sensor. As a result, these files have a wide colour space that can be controlled and utilized in editing software such as Photoshop. RAW files can offer the photographer complete control over their photographs, especially when it comes to tonality.

Colchester Zoo 

A zoological garden situated in Colchester, England. The zoo opened in 1963 and is home to many rare and endangered species, including big cats, primates and birds. Colchester Zoo is supported by ‘Action for the Wild‘, assisting in conservation projects worldwide. – Wikipedia

Architecture

 

Something is wrong. Response takes too long or there is JS error. Press Ctrl+Shift+J or Cmd+Shift+J on a Mac.
Pulls Ferry

Pulls Ferry

Pulls Ferry

Pulls ferry, captured on a fine Wednesday afternoon in the glorious sunshine of June. I have planned to capture this for some time now but never got round to it. The building stands out on the river as it is very unique compared to any others. If you have never seen it before it is worth a visit and there is a nice walk alongside the river leading up to Cow Tower.

Pulls Ferry is located on the River Wensum and is one of the most famous landmarks in Norwich, Norfolk. It is a flint building and was once a 15th-century watergate. It was the route for the stone used to build Norwich Cathedral. The stone came from France up the rivers Yare and Wensum. A canal, specifically built by the monks, used to run under the arch, where the Normans ferried the stone and building materials to be unloaded on the spot.

The building is named after John Pull, who ran the ferry across the Wensum from 1796 to 1841. It was previously known as Sandling’s, after a seventeenth-century predecessor. The ferry operated until 1943.

The ferry house adjoining the watergate was built in 1647. Both house and archway were restored in 1948-9 by Cecil Upcher.

Pull’s Ferry is a medieval watergate along the riverside walk, south of Bishopgate. The flinty building with its broad stone archway became the Watergate for craft carrying stone for the building of the Cathedral from the quarries near Caen on the last stage of the long journey along a canal, which joined the river.

Church of St andrew, Krakow, Poland.

Church of St andrew, Krakow, Poland.

The church of St Andrew

The Church of St Andrew was captured in March 2016 as part of my Auschwitz photography trip. Krakow main square is home to some beautiful architecture and great bars and restaurants. In the Old Town district of Krakow, Poland located at Grodzka Street, is a historical Romanesque church built between 1079 and 1098 by a medieval Polish statesman Palatine Sieciech. It is a rare surviving example of the European fortress church used for defensive purposes.

Built in Romanesque style, it is one of the oldest buildings in Krakow and one of the best-preserved Romanesque buildings in Poland. It was the only church in Krakow to withstand the Mongol attack of 1241. Along the lower part of the broader section of its facade are small openings that served as defensive windows at a time when the church was a place of refuge from military assaults.

From 1320 it was used by the Religious Order of Poor Clares. The building has been renovated many times. The present Baroque interiors have decorations by Baltazar Fontana, paintings by Karol Dankwart and gilded altars. The Baroque domes atop the octagonal towers were added in 1639 – Wikipedia

Photography Tips:

Shooting architecture wherever you may be, requires planning. It is recommended to know the location, weather and what equipment you think you will need. Generally speaking most photographer shooting architecture would use a wide angle lens, but this does depend on the location settings. I personally would take a wide angle and a small zoom lens, unlikely you will need massive telephoto lenses. If you have the time to do some geographical research before your shoot, you can identify the best possible shooting locations.

 

Instagram

Something is wrong. Response takes too long or there is JS error. Press Ctrl+Shift+J or Cmd+Shift+J on a Mac.
The Lighthouse

The Lighthouse

A very simple and subtle shot of Happisburgh Lighthouse, Norfolk, UK. I particularly liked the way light evades from the right hand side and the sky just breaks through. Capturing this image was difficult due to the windy conditions on the Norfolk coastline, however, perseverance prevailed.

In 1987 Happisburgh was one of five candle sticks declared redundant by Trinity House and deactivation was planned for June 1988. Villagers organised a petition to oppose the closure, and as a result the date was postponed. Under the Merchant Shipping Act of 1894, Trinity House may dispose of a working lighthouse only to an established Lighthouse Authority. On 25 April 1990 the Happisburgh Lighthouse Act received the Royal Assent establishing the Happisburgh Lighthouse Trust as a Local Light Authority, and Happisburgh became the only independently run operational lighthouse in Great Britain – Wikipedia

My recommendations in photographing Lighthouses or anything you would expect to capture on a coastline, is to use a decent tripod, Polariser and to be patient. In England expect windy conditions, also make sure to wrap up warm even in the summer as the North Sea winds can be bitterly cold at times

Recommended Print: Epson Semi-Gloss

 

Happisburgh Lighthouse

Happisburgh Lighthouse

Happisburgh (pronounced as ‘hasebrough’) Lighthouse on the North Norfolk coast is the only independently operated lighthouse in Great Britain. It is also the oldest working lighthouse in East Anglia.

The building was constructed in 1790 as one of a pair of candle-powered lights (“High Lighthouse” and “Low Lighthouse”). It was electrified in 1947. The tower is 85 ft (25.9 m) tall, putting the lantern at 134 ft (40.8 m) above sea level. The other lighthouse – the “low light” was 20 ft (6.1 m) lower. It was decommissioned and demolished in 1883 before it could be lost due to coastal erosion, its lantern being reused at Southwold lighthouse Together they formed a pair of range lights that marked a safe passage around the southern end of the offshore Haisborough Sands 8 miles (12.9 km) to the safe waters of ‘The Would’.

The lighthouse is painted white with three red bands and has a light characteristic of Fl(3)30s (3 white flashes, repeated every 30 seconds) at a height of 135 ft (41.1 m) with a range of 14 miles (22.5 km) – Wikipedia

Recommended Print: Hahnemuhle Pearl

Gate of Kirkstall

Gate of Kirkstall

Gate of Kirkstall,  a grand arch located at Kirkstall Abbey in Leeds, United Kingdom. The Abbey is a grade 1 listed building. The Abbey itself is located next to the River Aire, and dominates the surrounding land.

Kirkstall Abbey is a ruined Cistercian monastery in Kirkstall north-west of Leeds city centre in West Yorkshire, England. It is set in a public park on the north bank of the River Aire. It was founded c.1152. It was disestablished during the Dissolution of the Monasteries under the auspices of Henry VIII.

The picturesque ruins have been drawn and painted by artists such as J.M.W. Turner, Thomas Girtin and John Sell Cotman.

Kirkstall Abbey was acquired by Leeds Corporation as a gift from Colonel North and opened to the public in the late 19th century. The gatehouse became a museum.

Henry de Lacy (1070, Halton, c1123), Lord of the manor of Pontefract, 2nd Lord of Bowland, promised to dedicate an abbey to the Virgin Mary should he survive a serious illness. He recovered and agreed to give the Abbot of Fountains Abbey land at Barnoldswick in the West Riding of Yorkshire (now in Lancashire) on which to found a daughter abbey. Abbot Alexander with twelve Cistercian monks from Fountains went to Barnoldswick and after demolishing the existing church attempted to build the abbey on Henry de Lacy’s land. They stayed for six years but found the place inhospitable. Abbot Alexander set about finding a more suitable place for the abbey and came across a site in the heavily wooded Aire Valley occupied by hermits.

Alexander sought help from de Lacy who was sympathetic and helped acquire the land from William de Poitou. The monks moved from Barnoldswick to Kirkstall displacing the hermits, some of whom joined the abbey, the rest being paid to move. The buildings were mostly completed between 1152 when the monks arrived in Kirkstall and the end of Alexander’s abbacy in 1182. Millstone Grit for building came from Bramley Fall on the opposite side of the river – Wikipedia

St Giles Church

St Giles Church

St. Giles is referred to in Domesday Book (1086). After the Norman conquest it was one of the three large parishes forming the French Borough, the richest part of Norwich. Its 120 foot tower is not only the tallest in Norwich, but rises from the highest ground. A friendly Church in the heart of Norwich City Centre with a welcoming congregation.

https://stgileschurch.wordpress.com/
http://www.stgiles.churchnorfolk.com/

The Bell Tower

The Bell Tower

The Bell Tower, City Hall, Norwich, Norfolk, United Kingdom. This photograph was captured on a peaceful spring evening, I really liked the way the spotlight was shining on teh clock face.

The architects designed for Norwich an Art Deco public building of national significance. It was built to the highest standards, using superior materials and methods of its day. Even the bricks were specially made, each one being two inches longer than usual to better reflect the proportions of the finished building. Charles Holloway James and Stephen Rowland Pierce engaged Alfred Hardiman as their consultant sculptor. He contributed the iconic lions passant which guard the building, and three figures of Recreation, Wisdom and Education for the Council Chamber. His colleague James Woodford designed the six main bronze doors, incorporating 18 roundels showing the history and industry of Norwich. Eric Aumonier carved the city arms above the Regalia Room window on Bethel Street, and Margaret Calkin James provided textiles for some of the important rooms.

Over the years many Art Deco buildings have lost their hallmark fixtures and fittings, but Norwich retains many of its original features. This is particularly fortunate as the furniture, light fittings and other details throughout the building were designed by the architects themselves.

The materials used include Italian marble and English stone, Honduras mahogany and Australian walnut. Seating is upholstered in Moroccan leather, and rooms panelled in elm, oak, teak and birch. The Lord Mayor’s octagonal parlour is panelled in sycamore with French walnut trim, with the door finished in English walnut. The main frontage of the building is 280 feet long, incorporating a 200ft balcony

https://www.norwich.gov.uk/site/

Enlightenment

Enlightenment

Enlightenment

Norwich Cathedral, Norfolk, UK. The cathedral is a beautiful piece of architecture that took hundreds of years to build. Hopefully this photo will show a tiny piece of this beautiful building.

Norwich Cathedral

Is an English cathedral located in Norwich, Norfolk, dedicated to the Holy and Undivided Trinity. It is the cathedral church for the Church of England Diocese of Norwich and is one of the Norwich 12 heritage sites.

The cathedral was begun in 1096 and constructed out of flint and mortar and faced with a cream-coloured Caen limestone. A Saxon settlement and two churches were demolished to make room for the buildings. The cathedral was completed in 1145 with the Norman tower still seen today topped with a wooden spire covered with lead. Several episodes of damage necessitated rebuilding of the east end and spire but since the final erection of the stone spire in 1480 there have been few fundamental alterations to the fabric.

The large cloister has over 1,000 bosses including several hundred carved and ornately painted ones.

Norwich Cathedral has the second largest cloisters in England, only out sized by Salisbury Cathedral. The cathedral close is one of the largest in England and one of the largest in Europe and has more people living within it than any other close. The cathedral spire, measuring at 315 ft or 96 m, is the second tallest in England despite being partly rebuilt after being struck by lightning in 1169, just 23 months after its completion, which led to the building being set on fire. Measuring 461 ft or 140.5 m long and, with the transepts, 177 ft or 54 m wide at completion, Norwich Cathedral was the largest building in East Anglia – Wikipedia

Click here for information on Norwich Cathedral

 

 

Go Top
error: Alert: Content is protected, purchase a digital download.